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Racehorse Gardy’s Legacy tests positive for METH after winning run in Ohio – as animal activists demand trainer is permanently suspended

  • Post category:UK Racing News
  • Reading time:9 mins read


  • Gardy’s Legacy tested positive for D-methamphetamine after winning a race in Ohio on September 3 at MGM Northfield Park
  • His trainer, Samuel Schillaci, was fined $1,000 and suspended for one year
  • PETA said the punishment is not strong enough and is demanding Schillaci have his license revoked

A racehorse tested positive for the dangerous street drug methamphetamine after winning a run in Ohio – as experts warned the use of illegal substances in racing is ‘out of control’.  

His trainer, Samuel Schillaci, was fined $1,000 and suspended for a year, according to the United States Trotting Association.

But animal activists say the punishment is not harsh enough and are now demanding his trainer is permanently struck off 

The horse named Gardy’s Legacy was tested for drugs after winning a race on September 3 at MGM Northfield Park, with a blood sample testing positive for D-methamphetamine.

Video shows Gardy’s Legacy charged ahead early on in the race and kept the lead almost the entire time.

It is unclear if the drug test was administered out of standard procedure or if there was suspicion the horse was on drugs. 

A racehorse named Gardy’s Legacy (pictured) tested positive for for D-methamphetamine after winning a race on September 3 at MGM Northfield Park

It is unclear if the drug test was administered out of standard procedure or if there was suspicion the horse was on drugs

It is unclear if the drug test was administered out of standard procedure or if there was suspicion the horse was on drugs

Gardy's Legacy's trainer, Samuel Schillaci, was fined $1,000 and suspended for one year because of the positive drug test

Gardy’s Legacy’s trainer, Samuel Schillaci, was fined $1,000 and suspended for one year because of the positive drug test

The United States Trotting Association said the horse is now disqualified and as a result all purse money must be returned for redistribution, equal to $4,500.

During his suspension, Schillaci is barred from all grounds governed by the Ohio State Racing Commission.

If the trainer does not appeal the ruling, his suspension will be reduced to 60 days and the other 305 days will be stayed unless he commits another offense in the next year. 

According to the Streetsboro Area Chamber of Commerce, Schillaci works for a pet care and veterinarian company called Schillaci Stables.

PETA has warned the punishment is not enough and wrote to the chair of the Ohio State Racing Commission asking them to revoke Schillaci’s license.

‘Evidence shows this trainer administered a dangerous street drug to a horse and got a slap on the wrist for it,’ said PETA Senior Vice President Kathy Guillermo. 

‘There should be no place in Ohio racing – which receives subsidies that could be going to the state – for someone who risks a horse’s life with meth.’ 

PETA feels the punishment for drugging Gardy's Legacy (pictured) is not harsh enough and wrote to the chair of the Ohio State Racing Commission asking them to revoke Schillaci's license

PETA feels the punishment for drugging Gardy’s Legacy (pictured) is not harsh enough and wrote to the chair of the Ohio State Racing Commission asking them to revoke Schillaci’s license

The Ohio State Racing Commission told local news station WJW: ‘The judges gave the maximum penalty allowed by law. Statutorily, the maximum that a judge can issue is a $1,000 fine and a one year suspension.’ 

Freddie Hudson, CEO of the U.S. Harness Racing Alumni Association, said: ‘Back when I raced and trained horses, the drug issue didn’t exist. The drug issue started coming about in the 1980s and it’s gotten out of control.’

‘There are a lot of therapeutic medications but the illegal medications need to go. And the people that use the illegal drugs should be getting lifetime suspensions, not little slaps on the wrist.’



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